• Overwrite

5 Future-Ready Jobs to Look For

It is important to prepare for the digital economy by investing in relevant skills now, so that one can be confident in securing future-ready employment.

(© Alex Knight, Unsplash)


Technology has changed how people live and interact. The digital economy is the next big thing – banks have mobile applications, people are shopping online, and even dating has gone digital through platforms like Bumble and Coffee Meets Bagel.


Singapore is gearing up to support this reality. For example, Singapore is targeting to have 5G network coverage for more than half the country by end-2022. There are also scholarships that support those with skills relevant to the digital economy.


As the economy shifts towards the digital arena, it has never been more crucial to ensure that one’s job and skillsets are relevant and ready for the future.

It is important to prepare for the digital economy by investing in relevant skills now, so that one can be confident in securing future-ready employment.


Getting Ready for Tech


1. AI or Blockchain Developer


Artificial Intelligence (AI) and technologies like blockchain are becoming increasingly prevalent. AI can be found anywhere, including in one’s pocket – Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa are prime examples of AI. Blockchain is another key technology. It allows digital information to be distributed but not copied, therefore enabling resilient electronic transactions. One thing often associated with blockchain is cryptocurrencies, but blockchain can also be used for other purposes, for example e-invoicing.


2. Data Analyst or Scientist


However, these advanced technologies cannot work without data. In the digital age, data is of unparalleled importance. Social media giants collect data to sell to advertisers, and data is crucial to help AI learn and adapt to new situations. On its own, data may not make sense – this is where data analysts and scientists come in. Data analysts sift through data to identify trends and help businesses. Data scientists also interpret data, and can additionally make use of machine learning and algorithms to create predictive models and more.


3. Personal Data Protection Lawyer


The rise in awareness of how personal data is used by corporations caused more people to be conscious of personal data protection and privacy issues. In that line, careers related to personal data protection might see increased interest.


4. UI and UX Designer


Besides advanced technologies and personal data, e-commerce is another trend to watch out for. In Singapore alone, 57% of Internet users make online purchases or pay their bills online.

As more businesses hop onto the e-commerce wave, the demand for UI and UX designers will also increase. UI (User Interface) and UX (User Experience) are both crucial for a product. UX design focuses on how it feels to interact with a product. This includes how it feels to touch, hold or use a product. Unlike UX design, UI design is specific to digital platforms and considers the overall look and feel of an application. This includes buttons, typography, colour schemes and other features to ensure the product is attractive, intuitive and responsive. UI and UX design are important in the creation of websites and mobile applications, both of which are important for businesses making the leap to e-commerce.


5. Social Media Marketer


The prevalence of social media has also led many businesses to set up social media accounts. This allows businesses to interact directly with consumers and boost their brand image – for example, Wendy’s rise has been partially attributed to its social media strategy.

Social media also allows businesses to run ads based on their people’s browsing habits, making it a valuable platform to gain new followers or reach out to existing ones. In that line, social media marketers become important assets for any businesses keen on venturing into the social media space.


Finding Creative Outlets


A study has claimed that robots will put 20 million people out of jobs by 2030. Lower-skilled jobs, especially those that involve manual and repetitive labour, are more vulnerable to being displaced by AI. AI is also likely to affect high-skilled jobs, for example positions in insurance or accounting. Sectors that are less likely to be affected include education, arts and entertainment, and personal services such as retail, accommodation and food. What this means is that creative jobs are likely to still be in demand – for example writing, graphic design, photography, illustration and filming. As there is an element of human ingenuity required in the arts, it is unlikely AI can replace people in such positions anytime soon.


People should always consider their careers, no matter which point they are at in life. But as the economy shifts towards the digital arena, it has never been more crucial to ensure that one’s job and skillsets are relevant and ready for the future.


By Dawn Chan


#upskill #onlinelearning #onlinecourses

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